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25.05.2017
24th Annual MFS Conference - The final version of the program with the sessions, paper presentations and booklet is now available online
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05.05.2017
24th Annual MFS Conference - A preliminary version of the conference program is now available online
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28.04.2017
New Forthcoming Article at Multinational Finance Journal
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Guide for Authors
Table of Contents


1. Before you Submit
    1.1. Submission Declaration/Duplicate Submission
    1.2. Permissions
    1.3. Conflict of Interest
    1.4. Changes to authorship
2. Preparation of the Manuscript
    2.1. Language
    2.2. Basic Structure of the Manuscript
    2.3. Title Page
    2.4. Text Typesetting
    2.5. Appendices
    2.6. References & Citations
    2.7. Tables & Figures
3. Submission Fee, Editorial Policies and Proceedings
    3.1. Submission Fee
    3.2. Acceptance Criteria
    3.3. Desk Rejection Policy
    3.4. Regular Review Process
4. After Acceptance
    4.1. Copyright
    4.2. Plagiarism (RES)
    4.3. Proof Reading
    4.4. Forthcoming Articles

1. Before you Submit

1.1. Submission Declaration/Duplicate Submission


Duplicate submission may result in direct rejection of the article or in revocation of its acceptance for publication. Duplicate submission is defined as the practice of submitting the same or part of an article to two or more journals simultaneously. Submission of a manuscript to MFJ implies automatically that the article has not been published elsewhere and that it is not under consideration for publication to other journals and that all authors have knowledge and approve of the submission. Publications in the form of an abstract or as part of a lecture or academic thesis are not considered as duplicate submissions.

1.2. Permissions

Authors who wish to include in their article unedited published material (i.e., tables, figures, unedited part of a text etc.) should first obtain written permission from the copyright owner(s) before submitting their paper to MFJ. Any such permission should be submitted to MFJ in writing together with the manuscript. In the absence of permission documents, it will be assumed that the submitted work belongs originally to the authors.

1.3. Conflict of Interest

Conflict of Interest is defined as a set of conditions in which professional judgment concerning a primary interest, such as the validity of research, may be influenced by a secondary interest, such as financial gain. During the submission procedure, the corresponding author will be asked to state clearly any possible conflict of interest as defined above. A conflict of interest situation may involve financial or personal relationships with other individuals and/or organizations that could directly or indirectly affect a referee’s or editor’s judgment regarding the manuscript. By submitting a manuscript to MFJ, the authors affirm that they have not been paid for conducting the work that has led to the results that they are reporting. Otherwise, if the work submitted for publication has been remunerated the authors are required to state the source of the payment. If no such statement is made it will be assumed that no payment to the authors related to their manuscript has occurred.

1.4. Changes to authorship

Changes to authorship refer to the deletion, addition or rearrangement of author names in the authorship of accepted articles under review. After acceptance of an article for publication, the corresponding author is requested to proceed with possible changes to authorship. In case that the corresponding author wishes to add or remove an author or to rearrange the author names, he/she must inform the Editor-in-Chief for the changes providing at the same time the reasoning behind this decision and written confirmation from all associated authors that they agree with this change. In the case of addition or removal of authors, additional confirmations from the author being added or removed are required. The online publication of accepted articles is completed only after authorship has been agreed. Please note, that after online publication of the article, no changes to authorship can be made.

2. Preparation of the Manuscript

2.1. Language

All articles should be written in English language. Accepted articles should be checked for grammatical and spelling errors before online publication. Nevertheless, if English is not your native language, this may not be sufficient. In this case, it is recommended to have your article professionally edited by a specialized editing service. A clearly and concisely written manuscript will help both editors and reviewers to clearly understand the content of your paper. While recommended, the use of a language editing service is optional and does not constitute a requirement for publication in MFJ.

The following company provides language editing services in the academic field of finance and shipping including services such as grammar and spelling correction, text clarity improvements, improvements in the tone of language etc.: link. Authors wishing to contact the company should follow the link above to make agreements for specific editing services and payment. Please note that language editing from this or other companies does not guarantee that your manuscript will be accepted for publication in MFJ or in another journal.

2.2. Basic Structure of the Manuscript

Submitted manuscripts should follow a standard structure. In particular, the main sections of the manuscript should be ordered as follows:

  • Title Page
  • Main Text
  • Appendices  (if any)
  • References
  • Tables & Figures
  • More details about all five main sections are provided below.

    2.3. Title Page

    The title page of the article should include the following information:

    • Title of the article: The title of the paper should be brief and informative. Please avoid abbreviations if not essential.
    • Author(s) name(s) and affiliation(s): Authors` full names should be presented in the title page. Author’s affiliation (including university, faculty and department name) and author’s address should be reported in parenthesis below the author’s name.  Additional contact information is required only for the corresponding author. For more details about the corresponding author, please see below. This information is to be excluded from the blind copy of the manuscript.
    • Abstract: The abstract should be concise and must not exceed 150 words. It should be written as a single paragraph with no subheadings and it should clearly report the purpose of the article and its main results and conclusions. The abstract should be self-contained. References, footnotes and non-standard abbreviations should be avoided in the abstract.
    • Corresponding Author: A non-numbered footnote on the title page of the article should clearly indicate the name, postal address, telephone and fax number (including country and area code), and e-mail address of the corresponding author. Note that the corresponding author will be expected to handle correspondence at all stages of submission and publication process including post-publication contacts.
    • Keywords: Provide 4 to 6 keywords which can be used for indexing purposes. Keywords should be informative and representative of the content of the article. They should be reported in lower case immediately after the abstract and be separated by semi-colons. Avoid using abbreviations unless they are well-established by the corresponding literature.
    • JEL Classification Codes: The appropriate JEL code numbers should be listed immediately after the keywords. Please, provide at least one JEL code number but not more than six. Information on the JEL codes can be found in JEL (Journal of Economic Literature) Classification System.
    • Acknowledgements: Acknowledgements should be reported in the title page of the article in the form of a non-numbered footnote. Authors should provide therein full information on grants received and acknowledgements to people who contributed to their work (e.g., providing language and writing assistance or advice such as reviewers or conference participants, journal referees etc.).

    2.4. Text Typesetting

    • Basic Instructions: Text throughout the article, including headers, sub-headers, footnotes, references, and tables should be double-spaced and written in 11-point Times New Roman font. The first line of each paragraph must be indented. Articles should be written in the present tense and in the passive voice if applicable. For example, instead of “Our results indicate”, “My article presents”, “we employ the beta model”, etc., use “the results indicate”, “the article presents”, “the beta model is employed”, etc. Quotation marks and capital letters should be used only if necessary. Authors should use italic letters only in the cases of: etc., i.e., e.g., et al., ex ante, and ex post.
    • Headings: An appropriate heading should precede all sections of the main text. All headings should be left-justified, boldface, and numbered with consecutive Arabic numerals. Only the first letter of the headings is to be capitalized. Any sub-headings should have the same format as the main headings but they should be italicized instead of being typeset in boldface. For example:

              1. Introduction
              .
              2. Theoretical model
              .
              3. Empirical model
               3.1. Empirical Specification
               .
               .
               3.2. Hypothesis Testing

    • Equations: Any equations in the text should be numbered and reported on a separate line. The number of each equation must be right-justified. Note that all equations should be numbered, even if they are not mentioned in the text.
    • Abbreviations: Any abbreviations or acronyms should be spelled out at first mention and used consistently thereafter in the text. For example: "Total Factor Productivity (TFP)."
    • Footnotes: Footnotes should be double spaced and numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals. In general, it is recommended to avoid footnotes so that there is at most one footnote per page if possible. Do not include any tables or figures in the footnotes and do not use footnotes in the abstract or the reference section of the manuscript. If possible, avoid using displayed formulae in the footnotes.

    2.5. Appendices

    Appendices should be presented after the end of the main text of the article. Appendices must be cited in the main text where information about the content of the appendices should also be given. If there is more than one appendix, they should be denoted with capital alphabetical letters, i.e., Appendix A, Appendix B etc. Equations and tables & figures in appendices should be denoted with separate numbering, i.e., Eq. (A.1) etc., and Table A.1 etc., respectively.

    2.6. References & Citations

    Citations:

    Citations should clearly appear in the main text or in the footnotes sorted by by lead author’s surname and year. Ensure that each reference cited in the text is also reported in the list of references. References to unpublished studies cited in the main text (e.g. conference papers, working papers) should also be presented in the list of references.

    • In general, citations in the text should report author’s name first followed by the year of publication in parentheses.

              Example 1:
              In his influential work, Jensen (1986) argues…

    • In the case of two authors, both names should be reported in the text followed by the year of publication in parentheses. 

              Example 2:
              Anderson and Danthine (1981) show that….
              Following Anderson and Danthine (1981), Cheung, and Wong (1996) developed…

    • Studies by more than two authors should be reported to by the surname of the first author followed by “et al.” in italics.

              Example 3:
              The procedure in Brennan et al.’s (1989) study…
              Along these lines, Medvec et al. (1999) indicate that…

    • Single Parenthetical citation should appear as follows:

              Example 4:
              …as it has been discussed (Brennan et al., 1989)
              There is only one study (see, e.g., Anderson and Danthine, 1981)…

    • Multiple Parenthetical citations should be separated by semicolons as follows:

              Example 5:
              A number of studies in this area (Anderson and Danthine, 1981; Brennan et al.,
              1989)…

    • In case that more than one study by same author(s) published in different years is cited in the text, then the name(s) of the author(s) should be reported once followed by the years of publications in parenthesis separated by commas.

              Example 6:
              Jensen (1990, 1994) finds that…
              Jensen and Murphy (1990, 2004) show that…

    • In case that more than one study by same author(s) published in the same year is cited in the text, then each of these studies should be denoted by different letters of the alphabet that should appear immediately after the year of publication.

              Example 7:
              A number of studies in this field (Griliches, 1998a; Griliches, 1989b; Solow, 1953)
              …
              Griliches (1998a, 1998c) argues that…

    Reference List:

    • General Instructions: References should be double spaced and placed after the appendices, if any, otherwise after the end of the main text. The list of references should only include works cited in the main text. Ensure that no discrepancies in authors’ names or in publication dates exist. Do not use quotation marks or underlines or Italic letters in the reference list. The reference list should be sorted in alphabetical order according to the lead author’s surname. In case more than one study by the same author is cited, the references should be sorted by lead author’s surname first and by publication year second. The year of publication should be always reported after authors’ names in parentheses. Standard reference examples for each case are given below.
    • Journal Articles-Single Author:
      Carr, P. (1998). Randomization and the American put. Review of Financial Studies
               11, 597–626.
    • Journal Articles-Multiple Authors:
      Brennan, M.J., and Schwartz, E.S. (1977). The valuation of American put options.
               Journal of Finance 32, 449–462.

      Carr, P., Ellis, K., and Gupta, V. (1998). Static hedging of exotic options. Journal
               of Finance 53, 1165–1190.
    • Working Papers:
      Cheung, Y.W., and Wong, C.Y.P. (1996). Foreign exchange markets in Hong
               Kong, Japan, and Singapore. Unpublished working paper. University of
               California, Santa Cruz.

      Harvey, C. R. (1994). Predictable risk and returns in emerging markets. NBER
               working paper no. 4261. Cambridge, Mass., National Bureau of Economic
               Research.
    • Books:
      Williamson, O. (1986). Economic Organization: Firms, Markets and Policy Control.
               New York University Press, New York.
    • Chapters in Books:
      Dooley, M.P., and Shafer, J. (1983). Analysis of short-run exchange rate behavior.
               Chapter 3. In: Bigman, T., and Taya, T., (eds), Exchange Rate and Trade
               Instability. Cambridge, Mass., Ballinger Publishing.
    • Articles in Edited Books:
      Caselli, F. (2005). Accounting for cross-country income differences. In: Aghion, P.,
               and Durlauf, S. (eds), Handbook of economic growth, Elsevier, Amsterdam,
               pp. 679–741. 

    2.7. Tables & Figures

    Tables and figures are to be numbered consecutively using Arabic numerals and they should not be presented in the text but separately in a separate section of the article immediately after the list of references. Tables and figures must be informative enough to stand alone, i.e. they must enable the reader to fully understand them without referring back to the text of the article. All tables and figures should have a concise title followed by an informative legend. Any footnotes to tables must be indicated by superscript lower-case letters and reported as a note beneath the table. Note that figures should also be provided in an editable format (such as .jpg, .eps, etc.).

    Authors should use single spacing for table rows and align numbers using a tab only (no spacing). T-values and/or standard errors are to be placed in parentheses below the estimates. In order to indicate statistical significance of statistical values, authors may use asterisks. Three decimals for fractional numbers and standard errors and two decimals for t-values are recommended.

    3. Submission Fee, Editorial Policies and Proceedings

    3.1. Submission Fee

    Submission/re-submission fees are €80 for MFS members and €150 for non-members. In case of conditional acceptance where minor revisions apply there are no re-submission fee charges. In case the manuscript is desk rejected by the editor in the screening procedure, a submission fee of €80 applies to both MFS members and non-members (desk rejection usually is done within 3 weeks of submission).

    Payment can be made online using PayPal. Note that submissions will only be considered for the editorial review process after payment of the submission fee.

    Submission fees are used for the development of academic activities in the interest of the Multinational Finance Society, for providing prizes to those authors who publish articles in MFJ, etc.

    3.2. Acceptance Criteria

    The editorial policy is to accept for publication original research articles that conform to the generally accepted standards of scientific inquiry and provide pragmatic interpretations of findings. Recognizing the multinational origins of the submitted articles, the MFJ is open to research that reflects diversity in its methodological and theoretical underpinnings.

    Well-written articles which fall in the aims and scope of the MFJ and improve or reinforce the understanding of the subject under study are more likely to be accepted for publication in MFJ. The minimal criteria the articles should meet in order to be published in MFJ are the following:

    • The writing style and standard of English in the article should be clear and coherent, with no errors of grammar or spelling. Both American and British spelling conventions are acceptable but not a mixture of the two.
    • The article should present original scientific research that contributes to the advancement of existing knowledge on the financial or economic topic under study.
    • The scientific methods used in the article should be correct, appropriate and sufficient.
    • Authors’ claims should be supported by the results.
    • The article should encourage further research or debate on the subject under study.

    3.3. Desk Rejection Policy

    The Editor-in-Chief, in collaboration with the Managing Editors and the Handling Editor, decide whether to desk reject a manuscript. This decision is normally made within 14 days of submission and following payment of the appropriate fee. Desk rejection is not a common practice in MFJ but is applicable if manuscripts do not meet the minimum standards delineated above. Moreover, papers that do not fall into the aims and scope of MFJ or present a very poor writing style and/or an insufficient standard of English are likely to be desk rejected. Moreover, poor quality manuscripts that use incorrect or inappropriate scientific methods or employ an analysis that does not fit the research questions investigated in the article may also be desk rejected. Excessive length of articles may also be a reason for desk rejection. Hence, authors are advised to submit concise manuscripts according to the manuscript preparation guidelines listed below.

    3.4. Regular Review Process

    After submission of a manuscript to MFJ, the Editor-in-Chief allocates the article to one of the Managing Editors to check for fit with the journal’s aims and scope, to evaluate the paper’s contribution and to nominate referees. Manuscripts that are not desk rejected are sent out to (a maximum of) two referees, which are usually Associate Editors (in some cases only one referee is assigned). The Editor-in-Chief also allocates the manuscript to an Editor who will assess the paper for purposes of review. Once the referee reports are obtained, they are passed to the Editor in charge to make his/her own recommendation on the manuscript. The final decision (e.g., acceptance, rejection, major or minor revision) is made by the Editor-in-Chief following the input from all referee report(s) and recommendations made by the editor(s). The policy of MFJ is to allow up to three major revisions for each manuscript followed by a minor one (i.e., editing corrections etc.).

    4. After Acceptance

    4.1. Copyright

    Once an article is accepted for publication in MFJ, the authors will be asked to complete and sign the Copyright Agreement Form with which they assign the copyrights of the article to the Global Business Publication.

    4.2. Plagiarism (RES)

    Authors shall not engage in unacknowledged or unauthorised copying or replication of the work of others or commit any other type of plagiarism. The authors are advised to ensure that all references are fully cited throughout the manuscript. All source material should be clearly documented in the article. After acceptance of the article for publication, the manuscript is checked using advanced plagiarism detector software. Indication of plagiarism may result in revocation of the acceptance.

    4.3. Proof Reading

    After acceptance of the article for publication, a PDF file will be sent via e-mail to the corresponding author.  The authors should make use of this proof in order to check for typesetting, editing or conversion errors and the completeness and accuracy of the text, tables, figures, and references. For significant changes in the content of the article, the editor’s approval is required. Authors are advised to send back corrections electronically following the instructions reported in the initial e-mail. Please note that after online publication, no further changes can be made.

    4.4. Forthcoming Articles

    After completion of the proof reading procedure, the article will be uploaded on the official website of MFJ. This constitutes the first official electronic publication of the article.

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